Canadian Internment Camps of World War I:
Commemorating One Hundred Years of Closure

By Abby Tkachenko
A student of Slavic Linguistics at the University of Alberta

From 1914-1920, foreign nationals and naturalized Canadian citizens were forced to live and work in twenty-four internment camps across Canada, not because of something they did, but because of where they came from. Of the 8579 people who were interned, 5441 of them were immigrants from the Austria-Hungary Empire and Ottoman Empire, though the majority, around 5000 of them, were of Ukrainian origin. The remaining 3138 were prisoners of war who were not treated nearly as harshly as the civilians were, only working as needed to sustain wood for their fires and cook food for themselves. The civilians, on the other hand, were forced to work heavy labour jobs in harsh conditions while their basic needs including food, shelter and warm clothing would often go unmet. The vast majority carried Austrian passports and were now deemed “enemy aliens” by the government during World War I, simply because of the countries they originated from. In some camps, the men were forced to cut down trees with axes and run with oversized logs on their shoulders in the middle of winter, working from dawn until dusk. They were kept in an area surrounded by barbed wire and monitored by armed guards, always ready to punish anyone who tried to escape. There were two camps, one located in Vernon, BC and the other in Spirit Lake, QC that held entire families captive while 22 other camps held only men. For families who had been separated from loved ones, one of the hardest parts of being interned was not knowing how long they would be held in these camps or if they would ever get to see their family members again. An estimated 107 people died and 106 people went mentally insane while in these internment camps, causing immense pain and trauma to countless loved ones. The full effects of these internment operations will likely never be fully understood, though many survivors are said to have suffered from physical problems as a result of their hard labour.  Others are said to have suffered from mental health issues and alcoholism, rarely mentioning that period of their lives to their children or grandchildren in order to leave those memories and the accompanying trauma behind.

In the early 1950’s, the Canadian Government ordered the archived documents of the internment camps to be destroyed. It wasn’t until 2005 that the Canadian Government passed Bill C-331, “The Internment of Persons of Ukrainian Origin Recognition Act” which then, led to the creation of a ten million dollar endowment known as “Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund” (CFWWIRF). This was only possible because the Ukrainian-Canadian community fought for over a decade for the redress and recognition that the internees deserved.

Many people are shocked when they hear that this happened in Canada, a nation that prides itself on being so multicultural and welcoming to newcomers of all backgrounds. Yet, this is indeed something that happened here and it must be recognized and acknowledged as a part of Canadian history, no matter how shameful it is to admit. Basic human rights were stripped from thousands of people simply because the countries they originated from were seen as the enemy during World War I. Therefore, it is important to honour and acknowledge those who were affected by the internment operations by becoming educated on the matter, learning from the mistakes of the past and moving forward towards a better future.

June 20th, 2020 marks one hundred years since the last internment camp in Canada was closed. As time passes, it becomes increasingly important to remember these events so as not to repeat the same mistakes. Yet, as more and more global issues arise, we, as human beings must identify and fight against the “internment operations” of today, ensuring that the choices we make now are not looked back upon in shame, but are instead recognized as being a contributing factor to a brighter future.

Bibliography

1. Boyko, Ryan, director. That Never Happened. Armistice Films, 16 Aug. 2017.
2. “Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.” Welcome | Canadian First
World War Internment Recognition Fund | 202-952 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba,
R2W 3P4 | Phone: 204-589-4282 | Toll Free: 1-866-288-7931, Taras Shevchenko
Foundation, www.internmentcanada.ca/index.cfm.
3. Roy, Patricia E. “Internment in Canada.” The Canadian Encyclopedia, 27 Aug. 2013,
thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/internment.
4. “The Surprising Story of Canada’s Enemy Aliens.” YouTube, Telus Storyhive, 19 May
2007, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY4vTBQTpUA.
5. Luciuk, Lubomyr. A Time for Atonement: Canada’s First National Internment Operations
and the Ukrainian Canadians 1914-1920, 1988, http://www.infoukes.com/history/
internment/booklet01/.
6. Luciuk, Lubomyr. ‘Enemy Aliens’ Remember: Ukrainian-Canadians Pry Open
Internment Files, 8 Oct. 1988, http://www.infoukes.com/history/internment/booklet02/
doc-019.html.
7. CBC News. ‘Yes, This Happened’: How Lubomyr Luciuk Found out about the Internment
Camp in His Hometown. CBCnews, CBC/Radio Canada, 21 Dec. 2018, www.cbc.ca/
news/canada/ottawa/ukrainian-internment-kingston-documentary-1.4889177.


Канадські табори для інтернованих Першої Світової Війни:
Відзначення ста років з моменту закриття

Еббі Ткаченко,
cтудентка слов’янознавства, Альбертський Університет

З 1914-1920 року іноземні громадяни та громадяни Канади були змушені працювати в двадцяти чотирьох таборах для інтернованих по всій Канаді, і не через те, що вони зробили що-небудь не так, а через те, що вони народилися в певних країнах. Всього було 8579 інтернованих, з яких 5441 – вихідці з Австро- Угорської імперії та Османської імперії, більшість з яких, близько 5000, були українського походження. Решта, 3138 осіб – військовополонені, ставлення до яких було пом’якшене, аніж стосовно цивільних людей. Військовополонені працювали лише в міру необхідності, збирали дрова для вогнища та приготування їжі. Цивільні особи, з іншого боку, були змушені працювати у жорстких умовах, і їхні основні потреби, що включало їжу, притулок та теплий одяг, часто були незадовільними. Переважна більшість – австрійські громадяни, яких уряд Канади під час Першої Світової Війни визнав «підданими ворожої держави» лише через їхнє походження. У деяких таборах чоловіки були змушені вирубувати дерева сокирами та носити колоди на плечах взимку, працюючи зранку до вечора. Їх утримували в місцях, оточених колючим дротом і під пильним наглядом озброєних охоронців, які завжди були готові покарати того, хто намагався втекти. В більшості таборах утримували лише чоловіків, за винятком двох, в яких утримували інтернованих цілими сім’ями: один був розташований у Верноні в провінції Британська Колумбія, а другий у Спірит-Лейк в провінції Квебек. Для сімей, які були розділені, найскладнішим було те, що вони не знали як довго вони будуть знаходитись у цих таборах і чи вони коли-небудь знову побачать свої сім’ї. Загалом загинуло 107 осіб, ще 106 – збожеволіли, перебуваючи в таборах. Повноцінний ефект цих таборів для інтернованих, ймовірно, ніколи не буде повністю зрозумілим, хоча, як кажуть, багато постраждалих зазнали незліченну кількість фізичних травм внаслідок роботи в важких умовах. Інші страждали від проблем психічного здоров’я та алкоголізму і зрідка розповідали про цей період своїм дітям та онукам, залишаючи спогади та кошмари в минулому.

На початку 1950-х років уряд Канади наказав знищити архівні документи таборів для інтернованих. Лише у 2005 році уряд Канади прийняв законопроект C-331, «Закон про інтернацію осіб українського походження», що призвело до створення фонду в десять мільйонів доларів, відомого як «Канадський фонд визнання інтернатури Першої Світової Війни» (CFWWIRF). Це все стало можливим лише завдяки тому, що українсько-канадська громада на протязі десятиліть боролася за визнання існування таборів, та за відшкодування за наслідки.

Багатьох шокує, коли вони чують, що такі дії сталися в Канаді, країні, яка пишається своєю багатокультурністю та привітністю до людей будь-якого походження. Тим не менш, інтернація є частиною канадської історії, яку нам потрібно пам’ятати.

20 червня 2020 року виповнюється сто років з моменту закриття останнього табору для інтернованих в Канаді. З плином часу стає все важливіше пам’ятати про ці події, щоб не допустити повторення тих самих помилок. Проте, коли виникають все більш глобальні проблеми, ми, як люди, повинні їх розпізнавати та боротися проти сьогоднішніх «таборів для інтернованих». Таким підходом ми гарантуємо, що не будемо соромитись наших сьогоднішніх вчинків у майбутньому.

Бібліографія

1. Boyko, Ryan, director. That Never Happened. Armistice Films, 16 Aug. 2017.
2. “Canadian First World War Internment Recognition Fund.” Welcome | Canadian First
World War Internment Recognition Fund | 202-952 Main Street, Winnipeg, Manitoba,
R2W 3P4 | Phone: 204-589-4282 | Toll Free: 1-866-288-7931, Taras Shevchenko
Foundation, www.internmentcanada.ca/index.cfm.
3. Roy, Patricia E. “Internment in Canada.” The Canadian Encyclopedia, 27 Aug. 2013,
thecanadianencyclopedia.ca/en/article/internment.
4. “The Surprising Story of Canada’s Enemy Aliens.” YouTube, Telus Storyhive, 19 May
2007, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UY4vTBQTpUA.
5. Luciuk, Lubomyr. A Time for Atonement: Canada’s First National Internment Operations
and the Ukrainian Canadians 1914-1920, 1988, http://www.infoukes.com/history/
internment/booklet01/.
6. Luciuk, Lubomyr. ‘Enemy Aliens’ Remember: Ukrainian-Canadians Pry Open
Internment Files, 8 Oct. 1988, http://www.infoukes.com/history/internment/booklet02/
doc-019.html.
7. CBC News. ‘Yes, This Happened’: How Lubomyr Luciuk Found out about the Internment
Camp in His Hometown. CBCnews, CBC/Radio Canada, 21 Dec. 2018, www.cbc.ca/
news/canada/ottawa/ukrainian-internment-kingston-documentary-1.4889177.

Follow us: